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Tag: tobacco farming

Common Culprits
April 22, 2013 |

Common Culprits

The key to controlling weeds, just as in controlling insects and diseases, is proper identification. According to the North Carolina State University (NCSU) Flue-Cured Tobacco Guide, common weeds that affect tobacco crops include nutsedges, morningglories, common ragweed, pigweed and horsenettle. Growers need to identify the types of weeds that are present and should consult their […]

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Play In The Dirt
April 22, 2013 |

Play In The Dirt

The best soils for growing tobacco have good internal drainage that keeps standing moisture away from roots and, at the same time, good water-holding capabilities to combat dry spells in the growing season. (Note that you should always avoid transplanting into saturated soils, as tobacco roots require aeration and can begin to die in as […]

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Promoting Consistent Seedling Growth
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Promoting Consistent Seedling Growth

Ensuring that the seedlings emerge and grow at the same rate is essential to getting a high percentage of usable transplants. Research conducted by NCSU tobacco specialists has shown that as little as a three-day difference in emergence in a quarter of the seedlings could reduce usability, and clipping could not reverse the negative impacts […]

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Indoor Living
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Indoor Living

Most tobacco farmers using a transplant system grow their seeds in a greenhouse. This method of production remains the most popular method for predictable, uniform growth of high-quality transplants. Virginia’s Burley Tobacco Production Guide reports that use of a greenhouse reduces labor required for transplant production, gives greater control of environmental conditions and provides increased […]

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Fill ‘em Up
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Fill ‘em Up

Tobacco media typically consists of peat mixed with a combination of vermiculite (a natural mineral that expands with the application of heat) and perlite (naturally forming volcanic glass that also expands with the application of heat) in various proportions. The Kentucky and Tennessee guide points out that research has not yet found any specific combination […]

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Tobacco Float Trays: Choosing the Right One For You
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Tobacco Float Trays: Choosing the Right One For You

While there are a few different types of trays on the market for use in tobacco float systems, most trays are made of polystyrene. Standard options for growers include high-density, low-density, shallow-well and glazed trays. While high-density polystyrene trays are more durable, they are also more expensive, as they tend to be bulkier and heavier […]

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Smart Budgeting
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Smart Budgeting

This economy has everyone taking a hard look at what they spend versus what they take in. Modern tobacco farmers are no different. They are constantly reviewing their input costs to see what they can trim from their expenses without sacrificing the quality of their product. Keeping a record of how every dime was spent […]

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Help Wanted
[ 0 ] April 19, 2013 |

Help Wanted

Labor is the largest variable expense in tobacco growing, especially when it comes to burley. Tobacco production studies have generally indicated that despite some gains in labor efficiency over the years, it still takes 150 to 200 hours of labor to grow an acre of burley tobacco. Still, you can take some steps to help […]

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Clipping Tips
[ 0 ] January 12, 2011 |

Clipping Tips

Clipping is an important technique for tobacco farmers. It can improve the health and strength of a transplant, help keep all stem lengths and diameters alike, and be used to delay planting if field conditions are adverse. However, these benefits will only happen if you make sure to properly clip your transplants. Improper clipping can […]

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Just Add Water
[ 0 ] February 28, 2010 |

Just Add Water

Making sure your transplant is healthy continues with ensuring its source of water is optimal. You can verify the state of your water by collecting from and testing your water source, which will reveal both the alkalinity levels as well as the nutritional suitability for transplant production. Your county’s Cooperative Extension center can assist in […]

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