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Category: Magazine

Fire Ants
March 20, 2018 |

Fire Ants

Though their tiny jaws never chop your tobacco leaves, red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) can be a huge pain (literally) as they build their big mounds in greenhouses and fields. Ever since they marched their way across the American South in the 1930s, fire ants have made themselves known with their burning, pustule-forming stings […]

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Double-Duty Coverage
March 20, 2018 |

Double-Duty Coverage

For many years, burley tobacco growers have used cover crops in the offseason to protect the soil and scavenge nutrients. Because many tobacco growers also produce livestock, a team of researchers at the University of Kentucky is examining the entire enterprise as one system. The team includes assistant professors Ben Goff in forage and grazing […]

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Avoiding Pythium Root Rot in Float Bed Systems
March 20, 2018 |

Avoiding Pythium Root Rot in Float Bed Systems

Using float bed systems has many advantages over growing transplants in outdoor beds. It requires less labor, and there’s less worry about the effects of weather. Also, greenhouse-grown transplants typically lead to a more uniform crop in the field. This growing technique does have one major disadvantage, however. It can create near-perfect conditions for the […]

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Young Farmers:  Stepping Up to the Plate
March 20, 2018 |

Young Farmers: Stepping Up to the Plate

Over the past decades, the number of farms in America has decreased while farmers have grown a little grayer—a third of primary operators are now 65 or older. Now, however, those stubborn demographics are shifting. For the second time in a century, the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) census on agriculture shows an increase […]

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Winter Greenhouse Prep
January 24, 2017 |

Winter Greenhouse Prep

By Turner Walston Follow these five tips to make greenhouse spring cleaning a breeze. With tobacco out of the fields and cover crops planted, ‘tis the season to prep tobacco greenhouses for 2017 transplants. “Sanitation is the key word,” says Dr. J. Michael Moore, professor and tobacco Extension agronomist at the University of Georgia. “That […]

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Optimizing  Nicotine in  Tobacco
January 24, 2017 |

Optimizing Nicotine in Tobacco

By Julia Ellis In the field and in the laboratory, researchers are investigating ways to optimize nicotine concentration in tobacco for the noncombustible market. U.S. tobacco has traditionally been prized for its taste and quality. In the e-liquid market, however, taste is irrelevant. Nicotine content is the valued commodity. Currently India and China are known […]

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Mistaken Identity, Nonchemical tobacco plant injury
January 24, 2017 |

Mistaken Identity, Nonchemical tobacco plant injury

By Julia Ellis When tobacco plants show signs of injury or abnormal growth, farmers often blame chemicals. But experts point out that, when used correctly, chemicals don’t harm tobacco plants, and other factors are often to blame for these plants’ maladies. Weather Woes Leaf injuries—curling, weather flecks, spots, etching or discoloration—result from a variety of […]

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Going Electronic
June 29, 2016 |

Going Electronic

Why more growers are turning to electronic recordkeeping—and the options they might consider By Emmy Wade Every business owner should keep good records, and tobacco growers are no exception. In order to run a successful operation, financial statements, receipts and tax-deductible expenses are a weekly—if not daily—concern. In our electronic age, an increasing number of […]

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Topping Timetable
June 23, 2015 |

Topping Timetable

The Fair and Equitable Tobacco Reform Act of 2004 either bought out growers or freed them from quotas and restrictions. The end result: fewer tobacco growers planting more tobacco acres. Just four years after the buyout, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported flue-cured farms had increased in size by 50 percent, and burley farms […]

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Black Shank
June 16, 2015 |

Black Shank

Florida and Georgia witnessed the United States’ first black shank appearance in 1915. Having crept into Tennessee, Kentucky and North Carolina in the 1930s, black shank could be found in almost every flue-cured tobacco state by the year 2000, causing losses ranging from 1 to 2.5 percent per year in North Carolina alone. Are these […]

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