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Author Archive: speccomm

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World Leaf News, Second Quarter 2013
July 31, 2013 |

World Leaf News, Second Quarter 2013

Familiar  Face  in  Tobacco  Retires After three decades of serving the tobacco industry as both a tobacco specialist assisting Kentucky and Tennessee growers and soil scientist for the University of Tennessee and North Carolina State University, Paul Denton, Extension burley tobacco specialist, will retire at the end of May. “The most enjoyable part of my […]

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Easing Labor Pains
July 31, 2013 |

Easing Labor Pains

Growers, we know you’re all too familiar with the challenges accompanying securing enough labor to efficiently and economically plant and harvest your tobacco. Some of you who grew up on tobacco farms remember watching your own parents experience the same struggles finding help. “For my dad, recruiting labor was a year-round process,” said David Sutton, […]

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After The Thaw
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

After The Thaw

While things get cooking in the greenhouse, our spring sun is coming out to melt winter’s chill from the fields, readying them for 2013’s season. In this issue, we cover some hot topics to help you get warmed up for the year. Many of you got a jump start on the season by attending Good […]

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Common Culprits
April 22, 2013 |

Common Culprits

The key to controlling weeds, just as in controlling insects and diseases, is proper identification. According to the North Carolina State University (NCSU) Flue-Cured Tobacco Guide, common weeds that affect tobacco crops include nutsedges, morningglories, common ragweed, pigweed and horsenettle. Growers need to identify the types of weeds that are present and should consult their […]

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Play In The Dirt
April 22, 2013 |

Play In The Dirt

The best soils for growing tobacco have good internal drainage that keeps standing moisture away from roots and, at the same time, good water-holding capabilities to combat dry spells in the growing season. (Note that you should always avoid transplanting into saturated soils, as tobacco roots require aeration and can begin to die in as […]

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Crop Rotations
April 22, 2013 |

Crop Rotations

Proper crop rotation is one of a farmer’s best weapons against disease. Planting tobacco in the same field in consecutive years puts your crop at risk for disease and can also strip the land of vital nutrients. While rotating crops can be more difficult for burley farmers, experts cannot stress the importance of rotation enough. […]

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Field of Your Dreams
April 22, 2013 |

Field of Your Dreams

With budget plans in place and a healthy batch of transplants ready for the field, it’s time to get outside and start working your land. The best-case scenario is for growers to have access to the field several years in advance of planting. This gives you time for observation and recording of soil properties and […]

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Choosing Your Seed
April 22, 2013 |

Choosing Your Seed

Naturally, the factor that will influence you the most when choosing what seed to plant depends on your contract. The type of seed must conform to all of the terms that you have established with your buyer. Once determined, you should next focus on disease resistance and which seed variety is best suited for your […]

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Promoting Consistent Seedling Growth
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Promoting Consistent Seedling Growth

Ensuring that the seedlings emerge and grow at the same rate is essential to getting a high percentage of usable transplants. Research conducted by NCSU tobacco specialists has shown that as little as a three-day difference in emergence in a quarter of the seedlings could reduce usability, and clipping could not reverse the negative impacts […]

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Indoor Living
[ 0 ] April 22, 2013 |

Indoor Living

Most tobacco farmers using a transplant system grow their seeds in a greenhouse. This method of production remains the most popular method for predictable, uniform growth of high-quality transplants. Virginia’s Burley Tobacco Production Guide reports that use of a greenhouse reduces labor required for transplant production, gives greater control of environmental conditions and provides increased […]

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